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Papaver rhoeas Papaveraceae
 
Papaver rhoeas 'American Legion' 28B Mona Bourell

Papaver rhoeas by Cathryn Taggart

 

Papaver rhoeas is an annual herb that grows 12-30 inches tall. The flowers are large and showy with four overlapping, papery petals that can be white, pink, or orange, but are most commonly vivid red, often with a black or white blotch at their base. The flower stem is usually covered with coarse hairs that are held at right angles to the surface of the stem. A multitude of seeds are released from the capsule that develops following the flower, creating a long-lived seed bank in the soil. Poppy seeds can lie dormant for over 80 years before germinating, which is usually triggered by disturbance.

It is thought that Papaver rhoeas originated on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea and was probably introduced to northwestern Europe in the seedcorn (seed saved from one year's harvest for planting the following year) by early settlers, thus another of the common names, "corn poppy." It is known to have been associated with agriculture in the Old World since early times and has had ancient symbolism and association with agricultural fertility. A single plant can produce up to 60,000 seeds, and en masse when associated with field crops can yield hundreds of millions of seeds. Since it also has an affinity for pastures, stream banks, railroads, roadsides, and other disturbed sites, especially created by man, it has become very widespread and has naturalized throughout much of Europe, Asia and North America.

One of the world's most popular wildflowers, Papaver rhoeas is also known as Flanders poppy. These poppies bloomed prolifically on the Battlefields of Flanders, Belgium in World War I. Poppies growing in disturbed burial areas were the catalyst for the poem In Flanders Fields by Canadian medical officer Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae.

'In Flanders Fields the poppies blow between the crosses, row on row...'

Due to their brilliant red color ("rhoeas" being Greek for "red"), this poppy became a symbol for the war and was immortalized in this poem. Papaver rhoeas is a cultural icon which has become associated with wartime remembrance, especially on Remembrance Day, or Poppy Day, November 11, in Commonwealth countries. The practice of wearing artificial poppies has been adopted in many countries on this day, in honor and remembrance of veterans and those who have lost their lives in the line of duty.

IN BLOOM CONTRIBUTORS: Text by Corey Barnes. Photos by Joanne Taylor, Mona Bourell and Cathryn Taggert

Location

Papaver rhoeas can be found
in the Mediterranean Garden
(Bed 28B, 28C, and 28D).
Visiting Info >>
Map (Bed Numbers) >>

Profile

Scientific Name Papaver rhoeas.
Common Names Flanders poppy, common poppy, corn poppy, field poppy.
Family Papaveraceae (poppy family).
Plant Type Annual.
Environment Full sun to light shade in well‐drained, sandy to loamy soil. Best in cool‐summer areas.
Bloom Spring through Summer.
Uses Adds brilliant red color to a wildflower mix. Reseeds readily. Deer resistant. Attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.
 
 
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Fitzroya cupressoides

Fitzroya cupressoides

January

Polyspora longicarpa

Polyspora longicarpa

February

Polyspora longicarpa

Magnolia laevifolia

March

Fitzroya cupressoides

Cantua buxifolia

April

Magnolia campbellii

Magnolia campbellii

January

Magnolia doltsopa

Magnolia doltsopa

February

Magnolia liliiflora

Magnolia liliiflora

March

Vireya Rhododendrons

Vireya Rhododendrons

April

Leucospermum spp.

Leucospermum spp.

May

Senna multiglandulosa

Senna multiglandulosa

June

Tagetes lemmonii

Tagetes lemmonii

July

Eucomis spp.

Eucomis spp.

August

Cuphea spp.

Cuphea spp.

September

Phyllocladus trichomanoides

Phyllocladus trichomanoides

October

Phyllocladus trichomanoides

Saurauia Madrensis

November

Pinus pseudostrobus

Pinus pseudostrobus

December

Magnolia dawsoniana

Magnolia dawsoniana

January

Magnolia campbellii 'Strybing White'

Magnolia campbellii 'Strybing White'

February

Magnolia laevifolia'Strybing Compact'

Magnolia laevifolia 'Strybing Compact'

March

Aristolochia californica

Aristolochia californica

April

Chlorogalum pomeridianum

Chlorogalum pomeridianum

May

Arbutus menziesii

Arbutus menziesii

June

Romneya coulteri

Romneya coulteri

July

Cistus sp.

Cistus sp.

August

Rosmarinus sp.

Rosmarinus sp.

September

Dahlia spp.

Dahlia spp.

October

Salvia cacaliifolia

Salvia cacaliifolia

November

Salvia cacaliifolia

Salvia microphylla
'Hot Lips'

November

Magnolia campbellii

Magnolia campbellii

January

Magnolia denudata

Magnolia denudata

February

Magnolia x veitchii

Magnolia x veitchii

March

Iris douglasiana

Iris douglasiana

April

Aesculus californica

Aesculus californica

May

Vaccinium ovatum

Vaccinium ovatum

June

Sambucus racemosa

Sambucus racemosa

July

Sequoia sempervirens

Sequoia sempervirens

August

Asarum caudatum

Asarum caudatum

September

Deppea splendens

Deppea splendens

October

Montanoa spp.

Montanoa spp.

November

Bidens sp.

Bidens sp.

December

Acer palmatum 'Sango kaku'

Acer palmatum 'Sango kaku'

January

Magnolia campbellii 'Darjeeling'

Magnolia campbellii 'Darjeeling'

February

Bomaria spp.

Bomarea spp.

March

Rhododendron occidentale

Rhododendron occidentale

April

Polystichum munitum

Polystichum munitum

May

x Chiranthofremontia lenzii

x Chiranthofremontia lenzii

June

Salvia leucantha

Salvia leucantha

July

Hydrangea seemannii

Hydrangea seemannii

August

Wollemia nobilis

Wollemia nobilis

September

Cyathea cooperi

Cyathea cooperi

October

Pinus radiata

Pinus radiata

November

Correa spp.

Correa spp.

December

Garrya elliptica

Garrya elliptica

January

Magnolia x soulangeana

Magnolia x soulangeana

February

Senecio glastifolius

Senecio glastifolius

March

Ribes spp.

Ribes spp.

April

Oxalis oregana

Oxalis oregana

May

Calandrinia grandiflora

Calandrinia grandiflora

June

Taxus baccata

Taxus baccata

July

Romneya coulteri

Romneya coulteri

August

Passiflora parritae

Passiflora parritae

September

Malvaviscus arboreus

Malvaviscus arboreus

October

Monterey Cypress

Monterey Cypress

November

Aloe arborescens

Aloe arborescens

December

Aloe plicatilis

Aloe plicatilis

January

Banksia seminuda

Banksia seminuda

February

Zantedeschia elliottiana

Zantedeschia aethiopica

March

Magnolia laevifolia

Magnolia laevifolia

April

Araucaria heterophylla

Araucaria heterophylla

May

Toxicodendron diversilobum

Toxicodendron diversilobum

June

Clarkia sp.

Clarkia sp.

July

Agapanthus

Agapanthus

August

Brugmansia

Brugmansia

September

Cedrus spp.

Cedrus spp.

October

Protea repens

Protea repens

November

Camellia sinensis

Camellia sinensis

December

Thujopsis dolabrata

Thujopsis dolabrata

January

Gordonia longicarpa

Gordonia longicarpa

February

Rojasianthe superba

Rojasianthe superba

March

Echium spp.

Echium spp.

April

Iris douglasiana

Iris douglasiana

May

Digitalis purpurea

Digitalis purpurea

June

Felicia amelloides

Felicia amelloides

July

Ceroxylon quindiuense

Ceroxylon quindiuense

August

Amaryllis belladonna

Amaryllis belladonna

September

Ginkgo biloba

Ginkgo biloba

October

Acer morrisonense

Acer morrisonense

November

Ilex aquifolium

Ilex aquifolium

December

Picea sitchensis

Picea sitchensis

January

Telanthophora grandifolia

Telanthophora grandifolia

February

Aeonium arboreum 'Schwartzkopf'

Aeonium arboreum 'Schwartzkopf'

March

Leptospermum Spp.

Leptospermum

April

Salvia gesneraeflora

Salvia gesneraeflora

May

Lavandula spp.

Lavandula spp.

June

Pelargonium

Pelargonium

July

Fuchsia paniculata

Fuchsia paniculata

August

Luma apiculata

Luma apiculata

September

Luculia

Luculia

October

Arbutus unedo

Arbutus unedo

November

Cycads

Cycad

December

Restionaceae

Restionaceae

January

Hellebores

Hellebores

February

Ceanothus

Ceanothus

March

Rhododendron

Rhododendron

April

Psoralea pinnata

Psoralea pinnata

May

Fremontodendron californicum

Fremontodendron californicum

June

Leucadendron argenteum

Leucadendron argenteum

July

Crocosmia

Crocosmia

August

Gunnera tinctoria

Gunnera tinctoria

September

Pellaea rotundifolia

Pellaea rotundifolia

October

Fuchsia boliviana

Fuchsia boliviana

November

Erica canaliculata

Erica canaliculata

December

Magnolia campbelli

Magnolia campbelli

January

Magnolia denudata

Magnolia denudata

February

Camellia

Camellia

March

Geranium maderense

Geranium maderense

April

Acmena smithii

Acmena smithii

May

Eschscholzia californica

Eschscholzia californica

June

Dendromecon harfordii

Dendromecon harfordii

July

Romneya coulteri

Romneya coulteri

August

Eupatorium purpureum

Eupatorium purpureum

September

Epilobium canum sp.

Epilobium canum sp.

October

Grevillea spp.

Grevillea spp.

November

Drimys winteri

Drimys winteri

December

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